The interview is your chance to find out whether the company is committed to keeping you safe on the job. Asking questions about safety takes courage, but it might prevent you from working for an unsafe company.

Here are some things to ask during the interview:

  • Does the company give orientation and training to new employees?
  • Has the company had any workplace injuries? If so, what steps has the company taken to make sure it doesn’t happen again?
  • Has the company had any work related deaths? If so, what steps has the company taken to make sure it doesn’t happen again?
  • Does this company have a mentoring program in place?
  • Will I ever be left alone on the job?
  • If I feel unsafe, who can I talk to?

If the interviewer seems annoyed by your questions, it’s probably a sign that you should look for another company to work for. You deserve a boss that cares about your well-being.

Print these questions and take them to the interview!

When your job makes you feel unsafe or worried, stop doing it and say something. Refusing unsafe work is your right — and it not only protects you, but everyone around you. Here are the steps you should take when refusing unsafe work:

  • If you feel unsafe, stop doing it.
  • Talk to your supervisor about your concerns. 
  • If your supervisor doesn’t listen at first, get a bunch of your co-workers together and and respectfully confront your supervisor about the situation. If you feel unsafe, there’s a good chance your co-workers do too!
  • If your supervisor still doesn’t take action, talk to someone on your company’s joint health and safety committee, or talk to your supervisor’s boss.
  • If appropriate action still isn’t taken, call the Ministry of Labour and discuss your concerns.

Ontario: 1-877-202-0008
British Columbia: 1-888-621-7233
Alberta: 1-780-415-8690
Saskatchewan: 1-306-787-4496
Newfoundland: 1-800-563-5471
Nova Scotia: 1-800-952-2687
Nunavut: 1-800-661-0792
Prince Edward Island: 1-902-368-5697

  • If you’ve tried to address the situation but still don’t fell like you are being heard, quit! No job or paycheque is worth your life or health.

Remember, refusing unsafe work is your right. By law, your boss can’t fire you for refusing unsafe work. If you do get fired, call the Ministry of Labour in your province.

Sometimes, we think unsafe work is just something that affects our physical health. But unsafe work can also be in the form of psychological or emotional abuse. 

Here are some steps to follow if you or someone else is being harassed at work:

  • Talk to someone about your concerns. First, talk to your supervisor. Then talk to your co-workers, talk to a friend, talk to a parent — just talk to someone about what you’re going through!
  • If your supervisor doesn’t listen at first, get a bunch of your co-workers together and and respectfully confront your supervisor about the situation. If you are being harassed, there’s a good chance your co-workers are too!
  • If your supervisor still doesn’t take action, talk to someone on your company’s joint health and safety committee, or talk to your supervisor’s boss.
  • If appropriate action still isn’t taken, call the Ministry of Labour and discuss your concerns.

Ontario: 1-877-202-0008
British Columbia: 1-888-621-7233
Alberta: 1-780-415-8690
Saskatchewan: 306-787-4496
Newfoundland: 1-800-563-5471
Nova Scotia: 1-800-952-2687
Nunavut: 1-800-661-0792
Prince Edward Island: 902-368-5697

  • If you’ve tried to address the situation but the harassment doesn’t stop, quit! You deserve respect!
  • Always keep a written record of what is being said and done to you.

Remember, harassment might come off as playful, but it’s not okay – especially if it makes you or your co-workers uncomfortable. Here are some examples of harassment:

  • Any unwanted touching
  • Remarks about a person’s body, even if they are “compliments”
  • Creepy comments that make a person feel uncomfortable
  • Physical threats
  • Spreading lies or gossiping
  • Constantly criticizing someone
  • Excluding someone to make them feel alone

Statistics tell us that most people who get injured, or almost injured at work, don’t report those incidents. But how can hazards be corrected if know one knows about them?

If you were involved in an accident at work, follow these steps — even if you weren’t injured:

  • If you get hurt, or almost get hurt at work, tell your supervisor — no matter how small or insignificant the injury may seem.
  • Talk to your supervisor about what can be done so that accidents don’t continue to occur. 
  • Follow-up to make sure that changes have been made. 
  • If changes have not been made, talk to someone on your company’s joint health and safety committee, or talk to your supervisor’s boss. 
  • If appropriate action still isn’t taken, call the Ministry of Labour and discuss your concerns.

Ontario: 1-877-202-0008
British Columbia: 1-888-621-7233
Alberta: 1-780-415-8690
Saskatchewan: 306-787-4496
Newfoundland: 1-800-563-5471
Nova Scotia: 1-800-952-2687
Nunavut: 1-800-661-0792
Prince Edward Island: 902-368-5697

  • If you’ve tried to address the situation but still don’t fell like you are being heard, quit! No job or paycheque is worth your life or health!

Reporting accidents takes courage. Remember, by reporting accidents you could be preventing someone from getting injured or killed on the job.

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